Who has to fill out log books?

Q. Who has to fill out log books?

A. If you drive beyond 100 air miles from your terminal, or work more than 12 hours in a shift, you do.  If you drive a non-CDL vehicle, there are numerous exceptions that apply to you, instead of the 100 air mile rule.

Eric Arnold is a Former Enforcement Agent with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, and a leading expert on USDOT compliance for small businesses. Do you have a question for Eric Arnold? Email him at eric@arnoldsafety.com.

Arnold Safety simplifies D.O.T. Compliance for commercial vehicle operators. Get Eric Arnold’s USDOT Compliance Guide, DVD, & Regulations at ArnoldSafety.Com.

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242 thoughts on “Who has to fill out log books?

  • August 5, 2013 at 9:38 am
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    I live in NJ and have a chevy 3500 and 2 car trailer . Just getting into car hauling and wanted to know if logbook is needed and do I have to stop at weight scale if hauling to GA? Thanks

  • August 5, 2013 at 8:14 pm
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    Do I have to run a logbook if I cross state lines even if I’m within the 100 miles?

  • August 20, 2013 at 1:37 pm
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    I have a question… First, we are vehicles that do not have to have a TX DOT number due to being under 10,000 lbs. So my question is we are going to start doing some work in NM and I am wondering on the log book for the US DOT and crossing of state lines do those guys have to log all of the local work or just the work that will be across state lines?

  • August 20, 2013 at 1:42 pm
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    Logbook: Yes.
    Scales: Probably. Each state is different, you just have to read the signs prior to the scale. If they say, all commercial traffic, or all commercial traffic 5 tons and up, then that’s you.

  • August 20, 2013 at 1:43 pm
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    The limit to be subject to the rules when crossing state lines is 10,001 lbs. GVWR. So, if you are under that, you don’t need logs, or otherwise comply with the safety rules.

  • August 20, 2013 at 1:44 pm
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    No. Unless you are not back to the yard within 12 hours. Then you need a logbook. Otherwise you can keep your time on a time sheet, showing the time you started, the time you finished, and the total number of hours you worked that day.

  • August 23, 2013 at 1:31 pm
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    Hello Eric my business is in Washington state. I have 3 one ton trucks 12200 lbs gvw I haul trailers of 7000 lbs gvw. This puts me over the 16000 lbs . I got my dot numbers, I stay within 100 air miles. Do I need to fill out logs, record milage, record fuel receipts, vehicle maintainable logs,

  • September 7, 2013 at 9:15 am
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    I am going to start driving 2500 series truck rated 10,000 lbs.gvwr. I will be pulling a 24 ft. gooseneck trailer rated 14,000 lbs. will I have to go across dot scales and keep logbook. company has dot number, not for hire, do I need to use the magnetic placard on truck.

  • September 9, 2013 at 9:11 am
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    If you go more than 150 miles from the office, you need a logbook. Otherwise, you need to keep your time on a time sheet, recording the time you start, time you finish, and the total number of hours worked that day. As far as the scales, each state is different, so you have to read the signs before you get to the scale. For example, if it says “All commercial traffic”, that’s you. Or if it says all vehicles 13T or more, that’s not you. The vehicle must be marked with the USDOT number if you are crossing state lines, hope this helps.

  • September 9, 2013 at 9:13 am
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    You do not need logs, but you must record the time started, time finished, and total number of hours for your drivers on a time sheet, or have them punch a time clock. You also need complete maintenance records on the vehicles, including the trailers.

  • December 7, 2013 at 12:17 pm
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    I have a couple questions…I recently acquired a 1942 dump truck with a GVWR of 13500 lbs. Is it exempt from any U.S.dot regulations or registration? I am in Arizona. I plan to use it locally in my small town only. I also am purchasing a small 1 ton dump truck with a GVWR of apprx: 12000. What do I need to do to comply? A friend and DPS officer tells me things which seem to conflict with what I read online such as …”I don’t have to worry because I’m under 18001 lbs”. I read nothing about 18001 lbs. What does ADOT look for at portable scales? what safety equipment is required? Is there a book in print that I could purchase? Thanks!!

  • January 1, 2014 at 8:40 pm
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    I am wondering if I need to maintain log book for dump trucks for safety audit I don’t go over 100 miles but I live in north Alabama and go in to Tennessee. do you know of a good program to help with records and the safety audits Thanks Larry

  • January 8, 2014 at 12:31 am
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    Hello, I have Sprinter Van 2500 under 10000 gvwr, and I have CDL, I’m trucking for hire 48 states, do I have to have logbook? Thanks you.

  • January 8, 2014 at 12:37 am
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    Thank you*

  • January 10, 2014 at 8:48 am
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    Russ:
    1942 dump truck? Huh, sounds like something I would see on American Pickers or something. Anyway, if you stay wholly within Arizona, you are subject to the Arizona rules, not the Federal rules. The Federal rules are 10,001 lbs. and up. Some States have more lenient standards. In Pennsylvania, the non-for-hire standard is 17,001 lbs. I do not know what the Arizona limit is. Sounds like it might be 18,001 lbs. I would check with the Arizona DPS, or ADOT, or whatever, that will tell you if your dump truck is subject to the rules or not.

  • January 10, 2014 at 8:49 am
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    If you stay within 100 miles, you can keep your time on a time sheet, capturing the time started, time finished, and total number of hours worked each day. You do not need a logbook, as long as each driver has time start, time finished, and total hours for each day. It doesn’t matter that you go into Tennessee.

  • January 10, 2014 at 8:50 am
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    No, you are under the limit of 10,001 lbs. GVWR, so you are not subject to the rules.

  • February 6, 2014 at 1:44 pm
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    We are a construction company w/ office in Ga. I have a crew in Florida w/ Chevy Kodiak 4500’s. Usually the driver goes from hotel to job site and back to hotel after working on job site for 12 hours average. Does the driver have to log on duty each day? Or only have to log when moving to another job site in Fl. thats more than 150 miles?

  • February 19, 2014 at 4:26 pm
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    Well, I am going to assume the crew in Florida is beyond the 150 air miles? I would say at that point, they should be filling out a log every day because the truck has a GVWR of over 10,001 lbs., and they are beyond the 150 air miles. Hope that helps.

  • April 16, 2014 at 1:57 pm
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    Hello I just got into trucking and drive 26ft box gross @ 25900. Do I need a log book diving 75miles up and back from terminal and do I need to stop at weight stations? In MD

  • April 23, 2014 at 10:03 am
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    If you stay within 150 miles of your terminal, you do not need a logbook, but you need to record your time on a time sheet, with the time started, time finished, and total number of hours. Not sure, I think you do need to stop at weigh stations in Maryland.

  • April 30, 2014 at 1:47 pm
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    in the State of Washington I have a semi for private use, non commercial, not for hire, I am being told under WA laws I don’t need a CDL ??? is this true??

  • May 14, 2014 at 2:41 pm
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    Can you tell me when I need to run signs on my 3/4 ton truck pulling a 30 ft gooseneck trailer for commerce in the state of Texas?

  • May 16, 2014 at 10:48 am
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    No, not really. It goes by the GVWRs of the vehicles. In Texas, I believe the rules only apply if the combination is 26,001 lbs. or over. So, if your 3/4 ton, pulling the gooseneck is over 26,001 lbs., you would need the signs. But I don’t know the GVWRs of your vehicles. Just add them together, if it is over 26, then you need it. Or if the GCWR on the truck is over, then you need it.

  • May 16, 2014 at 10:51 am
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    Yes, probably. CDL stands for “commercial driver’s license”. So, if you are not in commerce, then the CDL does not apply. Strange, isn’t it? I can drive a giant RV the size of the Titanic, and do it with an operator’s license. The same principle applies.

  • May 29, 2014 at 2:43 pm
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    I have a driver with a class b license driving a large bucket truck for maybe 2-3 hrs a week within a 30 mile radius, does he need to have a log book? If so, can it be something that we put together on our own or is there an official log book available? Thanks in advance!

  • May 29, 2014 at 2:44 pm
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    I forgot to add that we are in Florida.

  • June 16, 2014 at 9:10 am
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    If your driver stays within 100 air miles of the office, and his tour of duty is 12 hours or less, you can keep track of his time on a time sheet, or time card. You must have the time he started, time he finished, and the total number of hours he worked that day. If you go beyond the 100 air miles, or work more than 12 hours that day, you have to fill out a logbook. The logbook is an official document: you can get them at truckstops, or buy them from JJ Keller.

  • June 27, 2014 at 8:29 am
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    We are a Water Well Drilling company in Michigan. We go all over the state (lower Michigan only), when we are going out of the 100 mile radius are we required to fill out a log book? Our drilling rigs do drive down the highway but are considered a construction vehicle and are not plated and are regirstered with MDEQ, the water truck we use is a plated vehicle. Our drivers leave from our office in the morning and return everday, the max. hours in a day they get usually is 11 – 13 hours a day (M – F). I heard that water well drilling companies are exempt from this, is this true?

  • July 13, 2014 at 12:24 pm
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    I deliver vehicles for a dealership. At times I drive box vans (empty) to Portland and Phoenix. Am I required to have a log book and DOT permits. Primarily I deliver or dealer trade cars within 150 miles and on occasion more than 150 miles.

  • July 28, 2014 at 7:03 am
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    Log book = yes…. at least when going out over the road. When staying within the 150 air miles, you can keep your time on a time sheet, time started, time finished, total number of hours that day.

  • July 28, 2014 at 7:16 am
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    Patti: yes, you need a logbook when going beyond the 100 air miles. Also, even though your drilling rigs are not plated, they are still subject to the safety rules. The driver must be qualified, have a logbook, and the vehicle must be inspected. DOT exempts off-road motorized equipment from the rules, but they define that as backhoes, bulldozers, etc., not equipment which can run at 45-50 mph on the road.

    As for the hours exemption, ground water well companies can restart their 70 hour clocks with a 24 hour off-duty period, instead of a 34 hour period.

  • August 1, 2014 at 6:53 am
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    MY MC NUMBER is in ga but am working in NJ which i have a job going less that a 100 miles a day radius
    which is terminal to terminal do can i use a timesheet instead of log book

  • August 5, 2014 at 7:51 pm
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    Hello I have two questions one do you need a class a cdl to drive a 2002 international bucket truck??? And do I have to keep paperlogs on me please respond A.S.A.P thanks

  • August 8, 2014 at 8:11 pm
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    I move tractors for a truck sales company on a dealer plate. No signage or ifta and only bobtail. do i need to use a log book?

  • August 14, 2014 at 8:15 am
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    If we have DOT stickers on our vehicles and are under the weight of 10,001 lbs…are we still bound by the HOS laws pertaining to working and driving more than 14hrs in a day and 70hrs in a rolling 8 day week?

  • August 26, 2014 at 1:38 pm
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    Whether or not you are subject to the rules goes by the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating of your vehicle. This is a value on a metal plate inside the door. If it is 10,000 lbs. or under, you are unregulated. So, that being said, if you are in an under-10,000 lbs. GVWR vehicle (3/4 pickup, for example), even if there is a USDOT number on the door, it is unregulated, and the hours of service rules do not apply.

  • September 15, 2014 at 8:44 am
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    Sorry, I missed this comment. Anyway, if your normal work reporting location is NJ, you can use the NJ terminal address as the base in calculating the 100 air mile radius. So, if you stay within 100 air miles of the NJ terminal, and are back within 12 hours, you can use the timesheet.

  • September 15, 2014 at 8:54 am
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    I don’t know, what’s the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating? If the GVWR is 26,001 lbs. or more, you need a CDL. On the logs, again, I don’t know, where do you go? Beyond 100 miles from your office?

  • September 15, 2014 at 8:57 am
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    Sorry, I missed this comment. You are subject to the rules, as you are moving a CMV in commerce, even though there’s no signage. If you are moving the tractors more than 100 miles from your office, yes, you would need a logbook.

  • September 15, 2014 at 7:10 pm
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    Hi. There has been some disagreements in the company I work for about crossing state lines. We have a three quarter ton dually four door pickup truck fully loaded with welding equipment. Occasionally we are required to cross into Louisiana to do work. Not hauling a trailer. Does this truck need to have DOT numbers on it and driver keep a log??

  • September 15, 2014 at 7:47 pm
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    I need to make a correction to my first question. The truck is a One ton Four door Dually fully loaded with welding machinery.

  • September 17, 2014 at 4:15 pm
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    Hey. Have a part time job that occasionally delivers new wreckets. Max size is a Ford F 550 with gvwr of 19500. What requirments do I need to follow. Some trips are out of state (GA). The job is for the selling dealer. Thank you.

  • September 17, 2014 at 9:22 pm
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    Hi I’m driving one time only a rental truck Ryder 20-26 footer with nine skids from Tonawanda NY to Louisville KY do I need a log book and do i need to stop at scale non commercial but small company? I’m a driver from Canada renting a truck in NY state.

  • September 26, 2014 at 1:30 am
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    Hi.. I have a couple questions.. I am starting a moving company locally in california. Im thinking about going interstate and travel all around california. I actually still rent my trucks with budget and oenske that display usdot numbers.. What authoritys do i need to get my moving company to be legit? Thanks

  • October 1, 2014 at 8:18 am
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    What is the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating of the 3/4 ton truck? This is a number assigned by the manufacturer, found on a plate inside the door jamb. If it is 10,000 lbs. or less, no it doesn’t need a DOT number of log. If it’s 10,001 lbs. or more, it does. If it pulls a trailer, you have to add the trailer’s GVWR to that of the truck. 10,001 lbs. is the magic number.

  • October 1, 2014 at 8:18 am
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    A one ton truck often has a GVWR in excess of 10,000 lbs., especially is it’s a dually. You should check anyways.

  • October 1, 2014 at 8:27 am
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    George: you need to follow all requirements found in the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs), except for drug testing and CDL. If you or your employer want to know what that all covers, please call me at (610) 582-4356, however, I am going to charge for my time on that one. Sorry, but explaining all the requirements is not something I can do in 3 minutes.

  • October 1, 2014 at 8:30 am
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    Each state is different. Some states want all commercial traffic to enter the scales, which would be you. Some only want CDL vehicles (13 tons or more). First you should find out what’s the GVWR of that truck, so you know if you need a CDL. You could contact the State Police of each state you will going through, or you could just play it safe and pull in.

  • October 1, 2014 at 8:35 am
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    Arnold: this is a pretty open-ended question, so if you want the whole thing explained, I can do it, but I charge for my time. Call me at (610) 582-4356. One free piece of advice: make sure you have operating authority from the FMCSA, and a USDOT number before you start going out of California. If they catch you without Federal operating authority, it’s a minimum $25,000 fine, no kidding. And they make you pay it all, too, because that’s the statutory minimum assigned by Congress. So, get operating authority.

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